Author Archives: jefftownsend

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The fauvism movement, I must admit, isn’t one of my favorites. I can appreciate the “painterly” approach the artists employed with their use of bold colors and gaudy brushstrokes, however, it is for those reasons that it doesn’t exactly appeal to me. I’d definitely take the works of Redon any day.

But having said that, I did find two works that did appeal to me.  The first is Andre Derain’s Portrait of Henri Matisse. I really liked how he conveyed shadow on the side of the face.  Also, the impressionistic quality I feel works very well with this portrait.  Plus, the fact that the guy resembles me a bit helped in my decision.

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The second piece I chose was Woman with large hat by Kees van Dongen. I chose this one because of the color pallet.  The dark maroon and black of the background really appealed to me and I think complimented the skin tones and almost neon green of the bow very well.

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Proof of the Afterlife (Or Not)

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Here is an article I found to be very interesting, not only for its relevance to our class discussions on early photography techniques, but also to my obsession with all things ghostly.  These pictures were taken by the “medium” William Hope.  By using the now common technique of double exposure, Hope was able to capture the image of a dead loved one.  Apparently Mr. Hope made a good amount of money on this trick, which he used around the early 20th c., and even after he was outed as a fraud, people still flocked to him to get their ghost pictures.  Clearly, with our standards, the pictures are fraudulent, however, the same practice of communicating with those beyond the grave still exists, and as technology gets better, most likely so will the art of faking ghosts.

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