Author Archives: amypearce0103

Fauvism

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Bonheur Henri Matisse

The Fauves (“the wild beasts”) were a short lived early 20th century group of painters lead by Matisse and Derain.  They were the 1st group to break from impressionism.  They are characterized by using strong, pure color straight from the paint tubes, use of contrasting colors, wild brush work, and a return to traditional subject matter.

 

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Aside

Required Materials:

  • 5×7 Black and White photo paper.
  • Photo chemicals: Developer, Stop Bath, and Fixer.
  • Plexiglass sheet larger than 5×7
  • Trays and tongs for each developing solution, 5×7 or larger.
  • Red Safe Light
  • 15 watt bulb 
  • Drop light electrical cord

 

Turn your bathroom into a darkroom:

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  • Mix your photo chemicals according to manufacturers directions.
  • Set up your stations, 1 for developing, 1 for stop bath, and 1 for fixing.

For the following steps, you must have the room completely blocked from white light, which means you may have to stop the bathroom door cracks with towels, and instal and use only your red safe light.

  • Take your Pinhole camera into the darkroom and remove the lid.
  • Open your photo paper packet, and remove a single piece of photo paper.
  • Immediately close the paper packet to avoid accidentally exposing the whole package.
  • Insert a piece of photo paper against the wall of the canister opposite of the pinhole.  The shiny side of the paper should be facing toward the pinhole.
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    This step was done out of the darkroom for photographic purposes only!! Do Not Do!

  • The paper should also be placed horizontal/landscape position.
  • Make sure shutter is completely covering the pinhole, and put the lid back on the canister.
  • You may wish to tape the lid closed to as a precaution for keeping any extra light out ( I personally did not do this step).

Now you can head out and take a picture!

  • Find something interesting to look at, aim the camera, remain still, and open the shutter.  The website I referenced for this project, http://users.rcn.com/stewoody/makecam.htm, recommended leaving the shutter open for 20 seconds on a bright day, which is what I did.
  • After 20 seconds, close the shutter, and head back to the darkroom the develop the paper negative.

Developing the paper negative:

  • Once in the darkroom under the safe light, open the camera and remove your paper.
  • Place the paper in the developing solution and gently agitate the tray.  Follow manufacturer’s recommendation for developing time, or observe the paper until it looks developed enough to you.  I kept mine in for 30 seconds.
  • Remove with tongs and place into the stop bath solution.
  • Agitate the paper in the stop bath solution for about 10 seconds.
  • Remove with tongs and place into the fixing solution.
  • Once the paper is in the fixing solution it is safe to turn on your regular white lights.
  • Keep paper in fixer for 2 minutes.
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Here is my negative in the fixer. 

  • Remove from fixer and rinse for several minutes then dry.
  • Once the paper negative is dry we can make a print.

Thoughts so far: 

I was excited to see that I was able to capture something.  I guess my aim was a little off because I didn’t get quite what I thought I was aiming at.  I am not sure why only such a small portion of my paper is a readable image.  Such an odd exposure may be due to: my camera letting in light, light leaking into the darkroom while loading, or the paper was loaded to far in one direction rather than centered in front of the pinhole.

Printing from the paper negative

  • In the darkroom under the red safe light, get another piece of photo paper ready.
  • Open your photo paper packet, and remove a single piece of photo paper.
  • Immediately close the paper packet to avoid accidentally exposing the whole package.
  • Place the new piece of paper shiny side up on a flat surface.
  • Place your paper negative picture side down on top of the unexposed photo paper, i.e. shiny side touching.
  • Place your sheet of plexiglass over the top of your papers, this keeps them smushed together.
  • Now you can use your 15 watt white light to expose the paper. 
  • http://users.rcn.com/stewoody/makecam.htm recommends holding the light 3 ft from the paper for a few seconds.  I could not find a 15watt light bulb that would fit in my drop light so I just turned on the regular bathroom light.  
  • In both methods this process is trial and error for figuring out how long you should expose the paper to light.  

Developing the Print

  • The process for developing the print is the exact same process as developing the negative.
  •  Place the paper in the developing solution and gently agitate the tray.  Follow manufacturer’s recommendation for developing time, or observe the paper until it looks developed enough to you.  I kept mine in for 30 seconds.
  • Remove with tongs and place into the stop bath solution.
  • Agitate the paper in the stop bath solution for about 10 seconds.
  • Remove with tongs and place into the fixing solution.
  • Once the paper is in the fixing solution it is safe to turn on your regular white lights.
  • Keep paper in fixer for 2 minutes.

Here are 2 separate attempts at developing a print: 

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First print in the fixer.

 It is a little too dark.  So I tried it again for less time.

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Attempt number 2 in the fixer.

This time there was too little exposure time.  I tried one more time and got almost identical results as the first time.  Unfortunately, I kept bad records and cannot remember how long I exposed these for.

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The negative plus 3 prints.  

 

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The negative and 3 prints cropped.

Final Thoughts:

I enjoy doing projects like this so I had a fun time.  I would definitely do it again, probably with a better designed pinhole camera, better records of exposure and developing time, more experimentation and practice in general.  

Art Experiment: DIY Pinhole Camera Part 2:

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Required Materials:

  • Oat meal Canister
  • Black Spray Paint
  • Soda Can
  • Craft Glue
  • Epoxy
  • Electrical Tape
  • Xacto Knife/Scissors
  • Card Stock
  • Ruler
  • Wooden Clothes Pin
  • #16 Beading Needle

Prepping the Oatmeal Canister:

  • Clean all of the crumbs out of the container with a damp paper towel.
  • Run a thin bead of craft glue around the inside bottom edge of the canister.

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  • Paint the inside of the canister as well as the inside and outside of the lid with black spray paint.
  • Once the paint dries, make a small square hole in the front of the canister 2 3/4 inches from the bottom of the canister.  This becomes the Pinhole Window.

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Preparing the Pinhole Plate:

  • Cut both ends off of a soda can (xacto knife).
  • Once both ends are removed, cut the body apart to make a 3×3 inch square plate with rounded corners (scissors).

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This is becomes the pinhole plate where we will drill the pinhole.

Making the Pinhole Drill:

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  • Use the left over bottom of the soda can to mix the epoxy.
  • Apply the epoxy to the inside mouth of the wooden clothes pin.
  • Insert the #16 needle in the mouth of the clothes pin (1/4 inch should be sticking out), clamp down, and let dry.  The final drill should look like this:

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Drilling the Pinhole:

  • Hold the aluminum plate very carefully and gentely press the “drill” until the point shows through the other side.
  • Continue until you have a 1/100th inch hole.Image

Installing the Pinhole:

  • Place electrical tape around 2 sides of the pinhole plate.
  • Make a circle around the pinhole with epoxy, be careful not to get any epoxy in the pinhole.  Image
  • Center the pinhole in the middle of the cut out square.
  • Place the plate in the container so that the sticky and epoxy sides are against the inside of the container.
  • Press and hold until epoxy firmly attaches. Image

Making the shutter:

  • Cut a 1 1/2 x 2 inch rectangle out of the card stock.
  • Cut a 3/4 x 5 inch strip out of card stock.
  • Fold the 3/4 x5 strip in half, then bend the ends into a “T” shape.
  • Glue the handle of the “T” together from the inside, and glue the top of the “T” to the 1 1/2 x2 rectangle.Image

Preparing the shutter slides:

  • Out of the same card stock, cut 2 1×7 inch strips.
  • Cut 2 10 inch strips of electrical tape.
  • Stick the tape to the strips leaving overhang on both ends.

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Attaching the shutter and shutter slides:

  • Align one shutter slide just below the pinhole box.
  • Attach gently, incase you need to adjust the tightness.
  • Insert the shutter into the first shutter slide, test to make sure you can slide the shutter but it is not too loose.
  • Attach the second shutter slide and adjust for easy sliding.Image
  • Now place the lid on you canister and you have a completed Oatmeal Canister Pinhole Camera!

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Coming Soon:

Art Experiment: DIY Pinhole Camera Part 2!

In which we load the camera and develop paper negatives and prints!

(Based on Pinhole Camera Guide found @ http://users.rcn.com/stewoody/makecam.htm)

Art Experiment: DIY Pinhole Camera Part 1